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U.S. Supreme Court

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Federal appeals court judge Merrick Garland (right) stands in the Rose Garden of the White House with President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden as he is introduced as Obama's nominee for the Supreme Court on Wednesday.

Justice in moderation

In a Q&A, Laurence Tribe explains how Merrick Garland’s long service makes him a well-vetted candidate for U.S. Supreme Court

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"It’s a big step forward," said Harvard Overseer and legal scholar Kenji Yoshino ’91. "Because taking us from 19 to 30 states is getting across the halfway mark, and that’s one indication of when the Supreme Court is willing to step in and impose something as the law of the land." At a rally in Utah, supporters celebrated the right for same-sex couples to be legally wed.

A watershed on weddings

After Supreme Court decides not to hear appeal, legal momentum shifts to states allowing same-sex unions, analyst Yoshino says

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“I think it’s an incredible group of people — smart, engaged, interesting, personable, really decent people. And I enjoy being with them," U.S. Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan told her HLS audience.  "Sometimes the folks who I disagree with are really among my favorites to spend time with."

Court sense

Associate Justice Elena Kagan provides peek into Supreme Court’s everyday workings

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A question-and-answer session with Mark Tushnet, William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, probes the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling that for-profit companies can object to the Affordable Care Act’s contraception mandate on religious grounds.

Denial of coverage

In upending health law’s contraception provision, Supreme Court suggests companies have religious rights

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“The case is quite complex because now, due to a change in state law, affirmative action based on race is impermissible in Michigan, but affirmative action based on athletics, or legacy, or a host of other factors, remains legal,” said James Ryan, dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Education. “Is that equal treatment or not? That’s a legitimately hard question to answer.”

It’s the who, not the what

Supreme Court's approval of Michigan ban on academic affirmative action focused on what voters can do, rather than on the outcome of their actions

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"Eighty percent of the public says there’s too much money in politics and it should be limited. And Congress, proceeding to get bipartisan effort, has actually repeatedly passed campaign-finance limitation. And it’s the Supreme Court that is striking it down," said Bemis Professor of International Law Noah Feldman. "This is a classic case of judicial activism, and it’s justified on free-speech grounds."

The politics of money

In Q&A, law professor says court ruling against campaign-finance limits is one more cut in a slow death

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