Tag: Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

  • Science & Tech

    Chen wins Lemelson-MIT Prize

    Graduate student Alice A. Chen received the prestigious $30,000 Lemelson-MIT Student Prize on Wednesday (March 9) for her innovative applications of microtechnology to study human health and disease.

    2 minutes
  • Science & Tech

    Leslie Valiant wins Turing Award

    The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) today (March 9) named Leslie G. Valiant the winner of the 2010 ACM A.M. Turing Award for his fundamental contributions to the development of computational learning theory and to the broader theory of computer science.

    4 minutes
  • Campus & Community

    Harvard welcomes back ROTC

    Harvard University announced on Thursday (March 3) that it will formally welcome the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) program back to campus, following the decision by Congress in December to repeal the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” law regarding military service.

    3 minutes
  • Science & Tech

    Chips, efficient and fast

    Professor Gu-Yeon Wei explores energy-efficient computing devices that are fast but draw minimal power.

    4 minutes
  • Science & Tech

    Deep water, deep trouble

    Two insiders view the BP oil spill as a failure of management — but also as an incident that revealed deep regulatory and safety failures.

    7 minutes
  • Science & Tech

    Innovate, create

    From oddities like breathable chocolate to history-making devices with profound societal effects, like the heart pacemaker, Harvard’s combination of questing minds, restless spirits, and intellectual seekers fosters creativity and innovation that’s finding an outlet in new inventions and companies.

    12 minutes
  • Science & Tech

    Slimy secrets

    Harvard researchers have discovered that Bacillus subtilis biofilm colonies exhibit an unmatched ability to repel a wide range of liquids — and even vapors. The finding holds promise for developing better ways to eliminate harmful biofilms that can clog pipes, contaminate food production and water supply systems, and lead to infections.

    5 minutes
  • Science & Tech

    Sharp turns

    Undergraduates in Engineering Sciences 51: “Computer-Aided Machine Design” spent a semester learning to design gadgets in SolidWorks, building candy-flinging catapults, and mastering the use of the soldering iron. Then came the final assignment: Transform a cordless power screwdriver into a functional all-terrain vehicle.

    6 minutes
  • Campus & Community

    Waves and the waggle dance

    In a lecture, titled “Good Vibrations: How We Communicate” and hosted by Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Howard Stone, Dixon Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Princeton University and a former Harvard faculty member, enticed children and their families into the world of physics and biology.

    4 minutes
  • Campus & Community

    Administrator by day, singer by night

    Karen Woodward Massey, director of education and outreach at FAS Research Administration Services (RAS), has always needed a creative outlet from her “right-brain” work. From ingénue roles to a staff cover band, the Grateful Deadlines, one thing remains the same: She has a ton of fun along the way.

    4 minutes
  • Science & Tech

    Squeezing life into patients

    Engineers at Duke and Harvard universities have developed a “magnetic sponge” that after implantation into a patient can “squeeze” out drugs, cells, or other agents when passed over by a magnet.

    3 minutes
  • Campus & Community

    10 named to new Harvard Library Board

    President Drew Faust has announced the names of the first 10 members of the new Harvard Library Board, which will oversee the transition of the University’s vast library system to a coordinated structure.

    3 minutes
  • Campus & Community

    At last, the edible science fair

    Final projects were displayed Dec. 7 for the “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter” science fair. Illustrating the tenacious bond between science and cooking, students used physics, chemistry, and biology to manipulate recipes and create foods that stretch the imagination.

    4 minutes
  • Campus & Community

    Michael Tinkham, superconductivity pioneer, 82

    Michael Tinkham, the Rumford Professor of Physics and Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics Emeritus at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and the Department of Physics, passed away on Nov. 4.

    1 minute
  • Science & Tech

    The looming water shortage

    The head of Nestlé explored ways to address a looming worldwide water crisis during a discussion at the Harvard Kennedy School.

    3 minutes
  • Arts & Culture

    A ‘whif’ of a breakthrough

    In David Edwards’ new book, “The Lab: Creativity and Culture,” he argues for a new model — the “artscience” lab — that “expands the possibilities of experimentation beyond those of traditional science labs.”

    2 minutes
  • Campus & Community

    Business School announces Tata gift; two initiatives

    A pair of building projects supported by the Harvard Business School takes aim at fostering leadership, innovation, and entrepreneurship.

    4 minutes
  • Arts & Culture

    Spouting off

    In their new book, “Running Out of Water: The Looming Crisis and Solutions to Conserve Our Most Precious Resource,” Peter Rogers and Susan Leal outline water’s global predicament as the world’s population soars to 8 billion.

    3 minutes
  • Campus & Community

    High marks for doctoral programs

    A national group rates Harvard’s doctoral programs highly in a sweeping new report.

    4 minutes
  • Health

    More from spores: How they spread

    Researchers discover how fungi developed an aerodynamic way to reduce drag on their spores so as to spread them as high and as far as possible.

    6 minutes
  • Science & Tech

    A clean break

    Engineers’ finding could provide crucial clues about cloud formation, differences between natural and polluted environments, and climate change.

    4 minutes
  • Campus & Community

    SEAS student awarded fellowship

    Emily Gardel, a Ph.D. candidate in applied physics at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), has been awarded a three-year Department of Energy Office of Science Graduate Fellowship.

    2 minutes
  • Nation & World

    Getting down to cases

    Business neophytes at Harvard and MIT wrap up the annual case competition, stepping out of their everyday fields to learn about being business consultants.

    5 minutes
  • Health

    Constant temps key to biodiversity

    New paper answers the long-standing scientific question about cause of tropics’ stunning biodiversity.

    3 minutes
  • Campus & Community

    Yes, it’s free

    At a Harvard “lawn swap,” everything was free, including a lesson on the environmental advantages of reusing office supplies and other goods.

    4 minutes
  • Campus & Community

    Scientists hit on universal theory of bubbles

    James Bird, a graduate student at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, finds that bubbles just don’t disappear.

    1 minute
  • Campus & Community

    Inside electronic commerce

    Harvard’s David C. Parkes studies the intersection of computer science and economics in order to simplify decision making.

    3 minutes