Couples who ate more fish were more likely to conceive, and had more frequent sexual intercourse, than those who ate less, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Researchers tracked outcomes over the course of a year from 501 couples in Michigan and Texas trying to get pregnant. The couples who ate four-ounce servings of fish twice a week or more had sexual intercourse roughly 22 percent more frequently than those who ate less, the study found. And 92 percent of the couples who ate the most fish were pregnant after a year, compared with 79 percent of the couples who ate less.

“Seafood may help in semen quality, ovulation and other markers,” said Audrey Gaskins, research associate at Harvard Chan School and lead author of the study, in a May 23, 2018 New York Times article.

Senior author of the study was Jorge Chavarro, associate professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvard Chan School.

Read the New York Times article: Is Fish the Food of Love, and Babies?

Read a UPI article: More fish in the diet could boost sex lives and fertility

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