CopyrightX — AKA ‘The MOOC the New Yorker actually liked‘ — is tooling up for a second run, expanding on its unusual, hybrid format.

The twelve-week networked course, offered each spring under the auspices of Harvard Law School, the HarvardX  initiative, and the Berkman Center for Internet and Society, explores the current law of copyright and the ongoing debates concerning how that law should be reformed. Through a combination of pre-recorded lectures, weekly seminars, live webcasts, and online discussions, participants in the course examine and assess the ways in which law seeks to stimulate and regulate creative expression.

This year, in addition to the real-world classes attended by 100 Harvard Law students and online sections for 500 students — taking the M out of MOOC — the course is adding more ‘satellites’ and integrating them more with the other two course communities.

Admission to the online sector of CopyrightX is free and is open to anyone at least 13 years of age, but enrollment is limited. Applications for admission will be accepted starting December 13, 2013.  For details concerning the application and admission processes, see CopyrightX:Admission.

The lectures, reading materials, maps, and recordings that have been developed for CopyrightX are also available for use by teachers and students in other settings. All of these materials are licensed under a Creative Commons License, the terms of which are available here.

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