Winthrop House stands like a line of sentinels along the banks of the Charles River between the Anderson and Weeks bridges. The House is actually made up of two buildings, Gore Hall and Standish Hall, which were constructed in 1914 as freshman dormitories. In 1931, when Harvard instituted the House system, the buildings became John Winthrop House, one of the seven original Harvard Houses.

Today, House Masters Ronald Sullivan Jr. and Stephanie Robinson lead a community of more than 400 students that celebrates the arts, athletics, and scholarship.

1 The center of Winthrop House activity and spirit resides in the House masters’ suite with Harvard Law School Professor Ronald Sullivan Jr. and Harvard Law School Lecturer Stephanie Robinson, their sons Trey and Chase (right), and their dog Nietzsche. Sullivan and Robinson made history when they were appointed the first African-American House masters at Harvard in 2009. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
2 Winthrop House has won the Straus Cup, Harvard’s House intramural (IM) sports championship prize, the past three years. IM is serious business at Winthrop, where last year more than 200 students helped to win the title. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
3 The stands at historic Harvard Stadium are empty, the vacant seats and aisles a dim reminder of the raucous crowds at major football games like Harvard-Yale. But most evenings, there is still plenty of action on the field — like the battle for the Straus Cup, where Winthrop House stands as the most formidable contestant. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
4 Undergraduates compete for the Straus Cup in such sports as flag football, soccer, softball, ultimate Frisbee, kickball, volleyball, crew, tennis, basketball, hockey, squash, table tennis, fencing, and dodgeball. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
5 Winthrop quarterback Andrew Badger ’12 (with ball) helped his House dominate, 58-18, against Mather House in flag football. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
6 Allston Burr Resident Dean of Winthrop House Gregg Peeples (far left) celebrates with the team. By the year’s end, Winthrop House claimed the Straus Cup for the fourth consecutive year and the 14th time since 1935. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
7 Harvard undergraduate students who reside in Winthrop House enjoy living among a rich history. Established in 1914, Winthrop consists of two buildings, Gore Hall and Standish Hall, and boasts the longest stretch of river views from any of the river Houses. This statue extends in the courtyard outside the House. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
8 Many of Harvard’s most famous graduates lived in Winthrop House, including John, Joseph, and Edward Kennedy. President Kennedy’s college suite has been furnished as a memorial and is administered by Harvard Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics to guests. Photographs of the president are on display in the room. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
9 Articles and memorabilia from President Kennedy’s time decorate the room. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
10 A bust of President Kennedy is on display in the room. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
11 Winthrop’s library holds many portraits, including this one of John Still Winthrop. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
12 The Winthrop shield is painted on the chairs in the Senior Common Room. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
13 A view of the impressive library in Winthrop House. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
14 Winthrop House residents crowded into the House’s Junior Common Room to attend the inaugural Winthrop Winter Showcase. Step dancers Sarah Peprah ’13 (from left), Kayla Shelton ’13, and Rachel Byrd ’13 perform syncopation, a modern hip-hop style that draws from African roots. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
15 Harvard Ballet Folklórico de Aztlán’s Marisol Romero ’12 and Keith Grubb ’13 (of Adams House) perform La Negra, a type of dance that originated from the Mexican state of Jalisco. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
16 The audience listens closely as Brandon Seah ’11 performs throat singing. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
17 Harvard Ballet Company members Kevin Shee ’11 (left) and Melanie Comeau ’13 (of Quincy House) perform “Reset” by Ricky Kuperman ’11 (not pictured). Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
18 Michelle Seslar ’11 of Kirkland House and Lionel Perez ’11, both former members of Harvard’s Candela Salsa Troupe, perform “Se Le Ve” by Andy Montanez. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
19 Max Meyer ’12 was the 2005 winner of America’s Most Talented Kid. At the talent show, he served as master of ceremonies and performed on piano. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
20 Winthrop residents watch their fellow Housemates’ performances. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
21 Students from Harvard Bhangra perform an energetic dance that draws from Punjabi culture and rhythms. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
22 Fresh from a panel discussion at Harvard Law School, stars from “The Wire,” including Michael K. Williams (Omar), Andre Royo (Bubbles), Sonja Sohn (Kima), Jim True-Frost (Pryzbylewski), and Jamie Hector (Marlo) — plus Donnie Andrews, the real-life inspiration for the notorious antihero Omar, and his wife Fran Andrews — attended a dinner in their honor at the river House. The evening’s regal-looking menu features the Winthrop House crest. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
23 Harvard Law School student Lea Downey (left) speaks with Andre Royo, who played Bubbles. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
24 Harvard Law School student Milton Wilkins (left) and Jamie Hector, the actor who played Marlo Stanfield, speak during the dinner. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
25 Harvard Law School Professor Charles Ogletree addresses the gathered guests. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
26 Harvard Law School student Brittany Brewer (center) speaks to “The Wire” star Andre Royo. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
27 Fran Andrews (from left) and Donnie Andrews are pictured during the dinner. Donnie Andrews is the basis for the famous antihero Omar in “The Wire.” Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
28 Cora True-Frost (from left), Jessica Sequeira ’11, and Jim True-Frost, the actor who played Roland Pryzbylewski, attend the dinner. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
29 Michael K. Williams (center, in hat) and Andre Royo (in glasses), the actors who played Omar and Bubbles, respectively, speak to the gathered guests following the dinner. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
30 Following the Morning Exercises on Commencement Day, Winthrop House celebrates the degree presentation ceremony. Family members watch the graduating seniors receive their degrees. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
31 Family members line up to photograph the graduates receiving their degrees. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer
32 Shelly Mason (left) and her son, Russell Mason, the first Mason to graduate from college, both shed a tear after he receives his diploma at Winthrop House. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer