Skip to content

Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Page 1 of 1

"It’s a big step forward," said Harvard Overseer and legal scholar Kenji Yoshino ’91. "Because taking us from 19 to 30 states is getting across the halfway mark, and that’s one indication of when the Supreme Court is willing to step in and impose something as the law of the land." At a rally in Utah, supporters celebrated the right for same-sex couples to be legally wed.

A watershed on weddings

After Supreme Court decides not to hear appeal, legal momentum shifts to states allowing same-sex unions, analyst Yoshino says

World|

Date

Sixty-six portraits of women who have made a difference through their inspiring work grace the hall of Harvard Law School’s Wasserstein Hall in honor of International Women’s Day. Second-year HLS student Maria Parra-Orlandoni (left, photo 1) stands with her nominee, Dana H. Born, a retired brigadier general. Ruth Bader Ginsburg (photo 2), U.S. Supreme Court associate justice, and Barbara R. Arnwine (photo 3), president and executive director of the National Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, are shown in portraits that will remain on display through March 14.

Inspiring women

Law School exhibit features portraits of influential policymakers, lawyers

World|

Date